6 Replies Latest reply on Nov 5, 2018 12:27 PM by BrianBolton

    Personal VM PI System

    BrianBolton

      I have heard of some PI users that have created a VMware Virtual PI System on their personal laptops. I am interested in hearing from PI Square members who have done this. Is it something you recommend? I come from an environment where I was connected to 9 virtual PI environments and a dedicated virtual development system. I need a development system in my new role but I want to have it local. I could by a PC and convert it into a PI system or try the VMware setup. If there is a white paper or set of guidelines available it would be great.

        • Re: Personal VM PI System
          Lal_Babu_Shaik

          Hi Brian

           

          You can install PI server on your machine if hardware supports and have PI server license. On your windows 10 laptop or desktop you can create virtual machine using Hyper-V or VMware tools. Make sure you comply with OSIsoft license agreement and machine signature file is required to activate PI System. You can follow standard PI installation guide once VMware or Hyper V environment is setup.

           

          3062OSI8 - Does OSIsoft support the PI System running on virtual machines (such as VMWare or Microsoft Hyper-V)

           

          Thanks,

          Lal

          5 of 5 people found this helpful
          • Re: Personal VM PI System
            rkunzman

            Hi Brian,

             

            As Lal said, a virtual machine setup is supported as long as you have a valid licence for the products you wish to install. Either of your options would work, you could have a dedicated physical machine, or virtual machines depending on what works best for you.

             

            The link he provided has more detail: 3062OSI8 - Does OSIsoft support the PI System running on virtual machines (such as VMWare or Microsoft Hyper-V)

             

            Thanks,

            Ryan Kunzman | Product Support Engineer

            • Re: Personal VM PI System
              Roger Palmen

              Hi Brian,

               

              I've done exactly this for many years. It works OK for development and research purposes. You only need sufficient CPU power (running i7), memory (16Gb min) and SSD is almost a must.

               

              Typically i have a Windows Server VM that runs the entire PI Software stack (SQL, DA, AF, Vision, etc.). As for PI Vision, integrators and stuff you need a domain, i've mostly set this server to be a domain controller. That does require some hacking though to make things work (e.g. AF install Go.bat changes to use domain groups for AF instead of local groups).

               

              The better way would be to use two VM's: one small domain controller VM, and a second VM where you run your PI software.

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • Re: Personal VM PI System
                  BrianBolton

                  That is a great idea. By any chance do you have your build documented in a shareable format? I would appreciate your sharing.

                   

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                    • Re: Personal VM PI System
                      Roger Palmen

                      Hmm, not really. I could only wish OSIsoft would distribute a VM, where you would only need to insert your own MS and OSI licenses to run it. Internally we have some VM's we share between collegues we've hand crafted.

                       

                      The tricky part is that the exact details tend to change over versions of the software, so what used to work on the previous version might not work for the current version. But roughly some ideas to get you started:

                       

                      For the PI system core (PI Server 2018, so SQL, Data Archive, AF, Analytics, Notifications) you don't need a domain, so you just create a Windows (e.g. 2016 Server) VM and install SQL Express and the PI Server tools.That you can do in just a few hours.

                       

                       

                      If you need Integrators or Pi Vision or other applications, you will need a domain, and thus things become more complex quickly. So for a 2- or 3-server VM stack you would need the following:

                      • A virtual network to combine the VM's, separate from the domain your host is running on
                      • A small server running Windows Server and DNS and a domain controller. Setting up DNS and AD is not really my area of expertise.
                      • A PI Server, joined to the domain for the PI System Core. Join the machine to the domain, and use service accounts to run your services. Use domain groups to map to PI system roles (Administrator, Operator, Interfaces, Services, etc.)
                      • And do the same for all other servers: PI Vision, PI Integrator, etc.

                       

                      I would recommend to create one VM for the PI Core, and separate VM's for the 'sattelite' applications like PI Vision and PI Integrators. That way you stay flexible and light-weight.

                      Hope this helps to get started! If you have specific questions, just ask PI Square! We've been there before.