4 Replies Latest reply on Dec 19, 2014 5:34 AM by Steve Boyko

    Standard test cases for PI Server up-gradation from PI 2010 to 2012 version

    Gaurav Agrawal

      Hi Folks,

       

      We are planning to upgrade PI server from 2010 version to 2012 version for one of our client.

       

      Just wanted to know if we have standard test cases and/or scripts readily available which we can use to test full functionality of upgraded PI server.

       

       

       

      Regards,

       

      Gaurav Agrawal

       

       

        • Re: Standard test cases for PI Server up-gradation from PI 2010 to 2012 version
          Marcos Vainer Loeff

          Hi Gaurav,

           

          I am not aware of any script used to test the full functionality of upgraded PI server. But there are other things you can do to test it:

           

          • Make sure that all main 7 seven PI Subsystems are running.

           

          • Check if the PI Message Log has an error message.

           

          • Open PI SMT and test if the application is responsive and returning the expected results.

           

          • Run some PI administrative commands under PI\ADM folder that would return the health status of your PI Data Archive. I believe that OSIsoft Technical Support would be the right channel for you to get those commands.

           

          We have though some scripts related to security. Please refer to this post for more information in case you are interested.

           

          Hope it helps!

              • Re: Standard test cases for PI Server up-gradation from PI 2010 to 2012 version
                Sam Pride

                As Marcos has said, there are no real "is it working" scripts; "Working" has different meanings to different people. The server may upgrade fine, but if the users cannot access the data using their favourite app, the upgrade would have "failed". You should make sure your tests cover more than just the PI server.

                 

                The PI System itself will report any failures to the error logs (or windows event log in a failure of PImsgss), so that would be the best place to focus after reviewing the installation logs. The "PI server daily Health check" is a good place to start. Don't forget to check that data is flowing in properly from *all* data sources (interfaces, ACE, AF Analytics, etc.). Also check the "PI Server post-upgrade tasks" section of the PI documentation

                 

                In my experience, the biggest issues with upgrades often isn't the server itself; it's the applications and users that consume the data. When helping customers plan upgrades and migrations, most of the focus has been on the consumers of PI data and making sure that they continue to operate as expected. It's at this level where existing (if any) test procedures should be followed.

                 

                It's a good practice to test the upgrade of a production system in a development/pre-production environment if you are concerned. Don't forget to backup first (and check to see if the backup works)!!

                 

                Best of luck!

            • Re: Standard test cases for PI Server up-gradation from PI 2010 to 2012 version
              Steve Boyko

              Typically we test after upgrades as follows:

              • Ensure SINUSOID is updating on PI server
              • Check tags from external interfaces to ensure they are updating (search by point source, display current values in PI-SMT, refresh)
              • Check PI message log for unusual messages / errors
              • Ensure clients can connect
              • Check external programs to ensure PI data is coming in/going out correctly

              They key is to know what is "normal" for the PI server prior to the upgrade, so you can compare afterward. Save a copy of the output of the Network Manager Statistics in PI-SMT; take note of the normal archive and snapshot rates under Snapshot and Archive Statistics; know what "normal" PI message logs look like.